Tag Archives: Life Sciences

Mapping, attracting, engaging Scientific Diasporas

Last week, in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada took place CSPC2015 – a  symposium to discuss the topic of diaspora scientists and their potential to strengthen international science and technology collaboration in Canada.

We were invited to share some ideas on how to map, attract and engage Diaspora scientists. You’ll find our presentation below.

About NamSor

NamSor™ Applied Onomastics is a European vendor of Name Recognition Software (NamSor sorts names). NamSor mission is to help understand international flows of money, ideas and people.

Reach us at: contact@namsor.com

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What’s in a scientist name? Applying onomastics in scientometrics: the case of Cancer Research

The IREG Observatory on Academic Ranking and Excellence is an international institutional non-profit association of ranking organizations, universities and other bodies interested in university rankings and academic excellence.

Our friend Tania Vichnevskaia of the French National Institute for Health (INSERM) presented the following paper ‘Applying onomastics to scientometrics’ on Monday at IREG International symposium organised by University of Maribor and Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

Download PDF 20150119_IREG2015_INSERM_NamSor_vF.pdf

On this same topic:

About NamSor

NamSor™ Applied Onomastics is a European vendor of Name Recognition Software (NamSor sorts names). NamSor mission is to help understand international flows of money, ideas and people.

NamSor launched FDI Magnet,  a consulting offering to help Investment Promotion Agencies and High-Tech Clusters leverage a Diaspora to connect with business and scientific communities abroad.

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NamSor presented during Symposium on Academic Excellence

Our friend Tania Vichnevskaia of the French National Institute for Health (INSERM) presented the paper ‘Applying onomastics to scientometrics‘ yesterday at IREG International symposium organised by University of Maribor and Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

NamSor as a private start-up company has been solicited in 2014 by a European country to help measure the ‘brain drain’ affecting its competitiveness in the BioTech sector and to produce a global map of its scientific Diaspora (who are they, where are they and what are they doing). The objective was to build up the country’s scientific international cooperation and to engage its Diaspora.

Serendipity led analysts to discover interesting patterns in the way scientists names affect co-authorship and citation – not just for this particular country, but globally.

Last year, during ICOS2014 conference at Glasgow University, we presented how data mining millions of scientific articles in PubMed/PMC LifeSciences database uncovered amazing patterns in the way scientists names correlate with whom they publish, and who they cite in their papers.

We were interested to mine the large commercial bibliographic databases (Thomson WoS, Scopus) because they offer better data quality on citations and useful additional information, compared to PubMed:

– firstly, they have the full name in addition to the short name cited with just initials; this significantly reduces the error rate of onomastic classification

– secondly, they link scientists to research institutions (affiliations) and geographies (country of affiliation) ; this allows additional analysis on the topic of Diasporas and brain drain, comparing -for example- the research output of Chinese / Chinese American scientists in the US with that of scientists of Mainland China;

– thirdly, those databases have a larger coverage in terms of scientific disciplines, allowing comparison between different fields of research.

So collaboration started between NamSor and bibliometric experts at INSERM –the French National Institute for Health- to evaluate and visualize the effects of migration, Diaspora engagement and possibly cultural biases in Science.

This is Tania’s presentation at the conference:

What does the ‘onomastic millefeuille‘ of the global Cancer Research community look like?

201501_ThomsonWoS_CancerResearchOn this same topic:

The agenda of the Symposium is presented below

2nd Maribor Academicus Event

Academic Excellence: BETWEEN HOLY GRAIL AND MEASURABLE OBJECTIVES

International symposium  organised by University of Maribor and Shanghai Jiao Tong University

within the IREG Project on Academic Excellence

19-20 January 2015, Maribor, Slovenia

Higher education can importantly benefit from the rankings and league tables when used in a context with clear perspective of what ranking actually reflects (Prof. Jan Sadlak, President of IREG)
Active participants at the conference will be:

  •            Prof. Jan Sadlak, President of IREG,
  •            Prof. Gero Federkeil, CHE (Coordinator of Multi-Ranking),
  •            Prof. Nian Cai Liu,  Jiao Tong University in Shanghai (Author of the Shanghai ranking list),
  •            Prof. Seeram Ramakrishna,  National University of Singapore,
  •            Prof. Santo Fortunato,  Aalto University,
  •            Prof. Karin Stana Kleinschek, University of Maribor,
  •            Prof. Henryk Ratajczak, member of Czech Academy of Sciences,
  •            Prof. Edvard Kobal, Slovenian Science Foundation,
  •            Roberta Sinatra, PhD, Northeastern University,
  •            Tania Vichnevskaia, French National Institute for health (INSERM),
  •            Prof. Andrée Sursock, Senior Adviser at EUA,
  •            Prof. Øivind Andersen, University of Oslo.

About NamSor

NamSor™ Applied Onomastics is a European vendor of Name Recognition Software (NamSor sorts names). NamSor mission is to help understand international flows of money, ideas and people.

NamSor launched FDIMagnet,  a consulting offering to help Investment Promotion Agencies and High-Tech Clusters leverage a Diaspora to connect with business and scientific communities abroad.

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Is China really becoming a science and technology superpower?

[read the FULL PAPER : ‘Measuring cultural biases in medical research‘] [in French]

Every now and then we hear stories about the making of China as a scientific superpower. How it overtook France in the global University Rankings:

‘In the 2014 edition of the world 500 top research universities, China keeps progressing. China has 9 universities among the top 200 (77 in the USA, 20 in Great-Britain, 14 in Germany, 8 in France). The trend is impressive: in 2004, China had only one University in the to 200.’ Source: LesEchos.fr

How it keeps increasing its volume of scientific publications produced:

‘The increased share of scientific publications produced by China (+231% between 2002 and 2012) is another indicator of the Chinese scientific growth. According to Ghislaine Filliatreau [of the French OST], it’s not only just an augmentation in volume but also in quality.’ LesEchos.fr

In China really becoming a scientific superpower? It may be so. We should however be careful how we interpret bibliometric information (volume and quality of scientific publications). There could be huge cultural biases currently unaccounted for, impacting international bibliometric rankings.

For example, let’s look at Scimago Journal and Country Ranking, an index based on the Scopus® database (Elsevier B.V.). China is already the second country in the world according to the number of scientific publications produced between 1996 and 2003. But if we consider the number of citations excluding self-citations, then China comes after Spain. The reason is that the ratio of citations per citable document (excluding self-citations) is lower than average.

Scimago Country Rankings

Next week, at ICOS2014 (the 25th International Congress of Onomastic Sciences and premier conference in the field of name studies), we will explore some of the cultural biases at play in LifeSciences. A presentation of PubMed (MedLine/PMC) data mining using NamSor software, conducted with onomast Eugène Schochenmayer, will take place at Glasgow University on the 28th of August.

Onomastics to measure cultural bias in medical research (ABSTRACT)

This project involves the analysis of about one million medical research articles from PubMed. We propose to evaluate the correlation between the onomastic class of the article authors and that of the citation authors. We will demonstrate that the cultural bias exists and also that it evolves in time. Between 2007 and 2008, the ratio of articles authored by Chinese scientists (or scientists with Chinese names) nearly tripled. We will evaluate how fast this surge in Chinese research material (or research material produced by scientists of Chinese origin) became cross-referenced by other authors with Chinese or non-Chinese names. We hope to find that the onomastics provide a good enough estimation of the cultural bias of a research community. The findings can improve the efficiency of a particular research community, for the benefit of Science and the whole humanity.

Some of the tools we’ve used to produce this research:

  • MonetDB, the open-source column-store pioneer; due to the multiplicative aspect of some queries (ex. counting articles authored by a scientist with a Chinese name, cited by a scientist with -say- an Italian name) the volume was huge and we couldn’t do with a classic database
  • RapidMiner, a leading open-source data mining and predictive analytics software
  • Our own RapidMiner Onomastics Extension, to predict the gender and likely origin of personal names

About Evgeny Shokhenmayer

Dr. Evgeny Shokhenmayer (MoDyCo, Paris 10), editor of e-Onomastics, online blog focused on onomastics research and publications.
http://e-onomastics.blogspot.fr/

About NamSor

NamSor™ Applied Onomastics is a European vendor of Name Recognition Software (NamSor sorts names). NamSor mission is to help understand international flows of money, ideas and people. NamSor launched @FDIMagnet,  a consulting offering to help Investment Promotion Agencies and High-Tech Clusters leverage a Diaspora to connect with business and scientific communities abroad.
http://namesorts.com/onomastics/fdi-magnet/

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Announcing NamSor™ for Life Sciences

Life Sciences is a key sector for countries to create organic growth, as well as to attract Foreign Direct Investments (FDIs). It is a sector of constant innovation: public institutions and private companies need access to local and international talents to thrive and remain competitive.

Having an accurate picture of a country’s local talent is critical to make strong local industries stronger (in BioTech, MedTech, Pharma, AgroTech, Industrial BioTech, …)

Talent in Life Sciences is global: the key people who can help design new products, make scientific or technical breakthroughs are mobile: they may be in the US, Switzerland, Denmark or somewhere else. How do you access international talent? Your best ambassadors to attract world class scientists are the people who are already working in your company or your country today.

Read further:

About NamSor

NamSor™ Applied Onomastics is a European vendor of Name Recognition Software (NamSor sorts names). NamSor mission is to help understand international flows of money, ideas and people.

NamSor launched FDIMagnet,  a consulting offering to help Investment Promotion Agencies and High-Tech Clusters leverage a Diaspora to connect with business and scientific communities abroad.

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NamSor Applied Onomastics to help Lithuania become a talent magnet in BioTech

LTUWorld reblog

Recognizing names and their origin in global scientific and technology databases allows research institutes and high-tech companies identify where the ‘brain juice‘ flows internationally. What are the main talent magnets (universities, companies) in a particular field? How best can a growing biotechnology industrial cluster retain local talent, as well as attract international professors?

Professor Daumantas Matulis, Head of Department of Biothermodynamics and Drug Design at the Institute of Biotechnology (Vilnius University) said ‘NamSor did a pilot project for us and helped us better understand the depth and breadth of Lithuanian talent deployed internationally, in the field of BioTech and Medical Research.’

Kotryna Stankute, Acting Director at Global Lithuania Leaders (GLL), network of international Lithuania-affiliated professionals, said it is crucially important to each country to be aware about their talent pool based out of the country. A strategy of networking with the world-wide Lithuanian professionals’ Diaspora and their engagement can turn brain drain to brain exchange.

Elian Carsenat, founder of NamSor, said ‘We data mined millions of research articles from PubMed Central® (PMC) to recognize Lithuanian names (or names related to Lithuania). By a happy accident, we also discovered that there exist cultural biases in medical research : a scientist of a given culture or origin is more likely to be interested in a particular topic; some scientific communities are more or less likely to be cited by another community. Such cultural biases could even impact the overall bibliometric ranking of a country’s scientific research. We turned this serendipity into a paper, which will share at the International Congress of Onomastic Sciences (ICOS 2014, Glasgow, August).’

In September 2014, Lithuania will host Life Sciences Baltics 2014, the only international forum in the Baltic region for world-class biotechnology, pharma and medical devices experts worldwide.

About the Institute of Biotechnology
Founded in 1975 as the all Union Research Institute of Applied Enzimology, currently,  the Institute of Biotechnology is mainly involved in research and training in the fields of biotechnology and molecular biology, including research and development of recombinant biomedical proteins, genetic and molecular studies of restriction modification phenomenon, developing of viruses diagnostics, epigenetic study of small RNA, drug design and synthesis, bioinformatics.
http://www.ibt.lt/

About NamSor
NamSor™ Applied Onomastics[i] is a European vendor of Name Recognition Software (NamSor sorts names). NamSor mission is to help understand international flows of money, ideas and people.

NamSor launched FDIMagnet,  a consulting offering to help Investment Promotion Agencies and High-Tech Clusters leverage a Diaspora to connect with business and scientific communities abroad.


[i] Onomastics (or onomatology) is the science of proper names. NamSor and NomTri are registered trademarks.

PDF document 20140101_NamSor_BioTech_offering_vFinaf.pdf

Further reading : [Leveraging a large Diaspora for Economic Growth | Investment Promotion Agency innovates to attract Foreign Direct Investments | Onomastics for Business]

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